Insulating Pipes


LAGGING PIPES WITH FIBRE BANDAGE LAGGING PIPES WITH FLEXIBLE FOAM TUBE

Hot and cold water pipes that are exposed to the cold should be lagged to prevent winter freeze-ups. Pipes in particular danger are those that run across a loft above an insulated floor, and those running along outside walls in unheated rooms.
Overflow and vent pipes that are exposed to the cold should also be well lagged.
To lag pipes that are boxed in, unscrew the box and stuff pieces of glass fibre or mineral fibre all round the pipes.

LAGGING PIPES WITH FIBRE BANDAGE

Things you will need
Tools Damp rag and scissors.
Materials Strips of glass fibre or mineral fibre, plastic adhesive tape or possibly siring.

1. Glean the pipes with a damp rag and allow to dry.
2. For pipes in the loft, begin lag- ging at the cistern. Wrap the ban- dage around the pipe two or three times and secure it with plastic adhesive tape or string.

3. Continue to wrap the bandage around the pipe, making generous overlaps of about 1/3 of the width of the bandage. Take care to ensure that the pipe is well covered at bends as these are the vulnerable areas most likely to freeze.
4. To join two strips of bandage) overlap the new piece and fix it with tape or tie with string.

5. Take the bandage around any valves or stopcocks as you meet them, leaving only the handle exposed.
6. If you want to improve the appearance of visible pipes lagged with bandage, build a simple box around them.

LAGGING PIPES WITH FLEXIBLE FOAM TUBE

Things you will need
Tools Damp rag and scissors.
Materials Foam tube of right size, adhesive tape and clips or adhesive.

1. Wipe over the pipes with the rag to remove dirt and allow to dry.

2. Lag the pipes leading from the cistern first, if you are insulating pipes in the loft. Wrap plastic adhesive tape round the first tube to hold it in place, even if the tube is one of the moulded self-locking types. Push it up tight against the tank so that the tank connector joint is covered.
3. Butt-join the tubes where they meet and wrap tape around the join to hold them tight. Also, secure a tube with tape, clips or adhesive wherever it seems to want to open.
4. Cut the tube with scissors to fit round the body of a gate valve or stopcock as far as it will reach. Make sure the whole of the pipe is covered.
5. If you want to change the colour of the foam which is only available in grey, coat it with emulsion paint. Never use oil-based paints or cellulose lacquers as they affect the plastic.